Sophie Rigg

 


Community Engagement and Public Realm

Community engagement work is central to developing effective communication between official organisations and residents. Building relationships and providing opportunities for residents to contribute their ideas and individual passions can at the very least provide a platform for discussion and when successful promote a legacy of community cohesion. These examples focus on ways of creatively working together to physically improve the look and feel of spaces, using creative projects as a catalyst for longer-term changes in the public realm.


 
 

Diwali (2010)

As Parade Manager for Brent Diwali, I worked with local secondary schools & over 13 community groups to initiate and develop a programme of creative activity that would enhance the parade. Delivered with arts professionals, the diverse range of activities from float building workshops to stilt walking and traditional dance, inspired residents to take ownership of the celebrations & showcase the skills they had learned.

Brent Diwali 2010 attracted a record 60,000 people with over 700 residents taking part in the parade.

 
             
 
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Streets for People (2009, 2010)

The creative element of the Brent Eleven Streets Project (Streets for People) focuses on improving the look and feel of the area through a programme of discussions and activities. As part of this project, funding was made available from the Transport for London Area Based Schemes allocation to involve the local community in introducing art elements to the streets. Residents have been invited to attend workshops and meetings where there was the opportunity to creatively generate ideas and imagery that would form part of the final work.

 
           
 
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Albert Road (2009)

As part of the redevelopment of the South Kilburn area, the policy and regeneration team are developing a series of public realm and community engagement projects that involve local residents in the changes that are being made to the area. Creative hoardings provide a temporary visual identity for the area and encourage residents to think again about the space around them.

 
               
 
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Brent Respect Festival Site Art (2009)

Five artists were commissioned to answer a brief to create new works of art that addressed the environmental theme of reuse and recycle. Run in partnership with Brent Artist resource and the Council’s Streetcare team, the final works visually enhanced the festival proving to be a photo opportunity and discussion point among all visitors.